CNFC/carte blanche 2017 contest shortlist revealed!

The CNFC and carte blanche are pleased to announce their 2016–2017 creative nonfiction contest shortlist.

The winner will be announced on May 5 in Vancouver, BC at the 13th annual CNFC conference.

The shortlist was selected by contest judge, Andreas Schroeder.

“To the Lighthouse,” by Kelley Jo Burke

 

Kelley Jo Burke is an award-winning drama and nonfiction writer, and writing teacher.  Her musical Us premieres March 2018 at Regina’s Globe Theatre, and “Bringing Up Fur Baby” (CBC Radio’s IDEAS) airs May 2017.

 

 

“The Unicycle in My Garage,” by Barb Howard

 

Barb Howard has published  three novels and one collection of short fiction. She has recently started to explore the amazing and difficult process of writing creative nonfiction.

 

 

 

“A Chaotic Jumble of Infinite Possibility” by Joshua Levy

 

Joshua Levy is a frequent storyteller on CBC Radio and recently received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts to write a memoir. He splits his time between Montreal, Toronto, and Lisbon, Portugal.

 

Congratulations to our three finalists and thank you to everyone who participated!


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Announcing the judge for the 2017 carte blanche/CNFC contest

This year’s carte blanche / CNFC creative nonfiction contest judge is Andreas Schroeder.

Not only is Andreas a prolific writer and a voracious reader, he’s also a veteran nominee and past winner and judge of several writing and book awards.

Carte Blanche is one of Canada’s most substantial literary magazines, and its annual CNF competition always attracts editors’ special attention due to its outstanding submissions. But this year’s longlist was so impressive, and its three finalists so totally neck-and-neck, I may have to consult King Solomon for a few suggestions.”

Watch for the shortlist announcement on Friday, March 24. The winner will be revealed at the 2017 CNFC Conference, May 5 and 6 in Vancouver.

Andreas currently holds the Rogers Communications Chair in Creative Nonfiction at the University of British Columbia (UBC Creative Writing). To date, he has published an impressive 23 books. He has been a finalist for the Governor-General’s Award (Shaking It Rough, 1976), the Sealbooks First Novel Award (Dustship Glory, 1984), the Arthur Ellis Award for Best Non-Fiction (Cheats, Charlatans & Chicanery, 1998), and the BC Book Prizes’ Ethel Wilson Fiction Award (Renovating Heaven, 2008). He won a National Magazine Award in 1990, a Stephen Leacock Award in 1997, and a Canadian Association of Journalists’ Best Investigative Journalism Award in 1991.

Announcing the 2016-17 carte blanche / CNFC contest long list

carte blanche and the Creative Nonfiction Collective Society are pleased to announce the long list for our 2016-17 creative nonfiction competition:

“To the Lighthouse” by Kelley Jo Burke (Regina, SK)
“Doing Better” by Ann Cavlovic (Gatineau, QC)
“Life and Good Fortune” by Patti Edgar (Calgary, AB)
“Darkroom, Daydream” by Matthew Hollett (St. John’s, NL)
“The Unicycle in My Garage” by Barb Howard (Calgary, AB)
“Heavy Wait for Silence” by Lee Kvern (Okotoks, AB)
“A Chaotic Jumble of Infinite Possibility” by Joshua Levy (Montreal, QC)
“Zion’s Children” by Susan Scott (Waterloo, ON)
“The Wedding Rings” by Norah Wakula (Hamilton, ON)

Congratulations to everyone who made the long list and a big thank you to all who participated!

Thank you also to competition readers: Nicole Breit, Lorri Neilsen Glenn, and Gregory McCormick.

Watch for the short list announcement on Friday,  March 24, 2017.

The winner of the competition will be announced at the 13th Annual CNFC Conference, which will be held in Vancouver from May 5 – 6, 2017.


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2017 CNFC Conference registration is now open!

Our annual members conference takes place May 5 to 6 in Vancouver, BC.

Register today!

Early bird rates (by March 31): $100 ($80 for students)

Regular rates (April 1 to 21): $125 ($80 for students)

Last day of registration is April 21.

The conference fee includes the following:

Friday, May 5:

CNFC Gala Dinner and Literary Cabaret

Saturday, May 6:

Keynote lecture featuring Deborah Campbell

An in-conversation session with Hal Wake and Joy Kogawa

Three concurrent member-led workshop sessions featuring Andreas Schroeder, Ruby Swanson, Betsy Warland, Crystal Chan, Myrna Kostash, Julie Salverson and Ellen Bielawksi.

Plus: Plenary discussion featuring CNFC founding members, coffee break, members book table, and a lunch-hour CNFC annual general meeting.

Read the full 2017 program details.

Note: You must be an active CNFC member to attend the Annual CNFC Conference. Memberships are only $50 ($25 for students). Find out how to join today!

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‘More than anything I want to be immersed in story’

Vancouver Holiday Photography
 
 

Nicole Breit, winner of the 2016 CNFC/carte blanche contest, offers tips and words of encouragement for this year’s contestants

Can you tell us about your winning piece and why you think it was selected?

When I submitted “Spectrum” I very much took the carte blanche tagline— “there’s more than one way to tell a story” — to heart.

I wrote the piece in a course about a unique hybrid form called the lyric essay. I was intrigued by the versatility and possibility of the form — the place where poetry meets the personal essay. It allowed me to explore the anxieties, joys, challenges, and small victories that go along with being a rainbow family in a way that wasn’t strictly chronological. Instead the story is told through a series of memories and images organized by colour.

As for why it was selected, when Deni Béchard presented me with the award, he talked about how “Spectrum” addressed an important contemporary issue, the emotional sensitivity in the work, and its stylistic innovation.

What makes a creative nonfiction piece stand out from the crowd, and what will you be looking for when you read this year’s submissions?

There are so many possibilities, no one formula for what makes a stand-out piece of writing. But if I had to try to distill it, I think exceptional writing comes down to the writer’s control over the piece. The work delivers maximum impact with every craft choice, from the choice of form, to command of language, and an unwavering attention to what the reader needs, every step of the way.

In terms of contest submissions, I’d love to read experimental pieces — work that stretches and pulls and challenges the genre in some way. I’m very open in terms of subject or style. Send in your humour and travel writing, your literary journalism, your flash nonfiction. More than anything I want to be immersed in story, to lose myself in the world of the writer.

Are there different considerations when submitting to a CNF contest versus those centred around other genres? 

I think the relative newness of the genre is a great advantage for contestants. If you take a risk, try something new, you have a good chance of capturing a judge’s attention.

I imagine there is also less competition with CNF contests than poetry contests. Poetry contests often accept multiple poems per entry. With CNF your chances of being shortlisted or winning are much higher than if you submit to a poetry contest based on entry volume alone.

I’ve also heard from literary magazine editors that they receive fewer entries to contests than regular submissions to their publications, further increasing your odds for getting noticed when submitting to a CNF contest.

In addition to the CNFC win, you were also awarded the 2016 Room Magazine award for creative nonfiction. How have these experiences contributed to your literary career?

When I started submitting to contests, my ultimate goal was the cover letter I’d one day write, when I was ready to approach an editor about publishing a collection of my work. The CNFC/carte blanche and Room awards are accomplishments I’m very proud to include on my CV, and I hope will bring me closer to my bigger goal.

This year my world has opened up thanks to these contests. I’ve received invitations to read, which have allowed me to connect with other writers and readers in a very immediate way. Reading to an audience has permitted me to see in someone’s face how a line hits them. People sometimes approach me to tell me a bit about their own lives, and why something I’ve written has moved them. This wonderful intersection of heart and imagination has deepened my love for writing and why I think it’s so important.

What piece of advice can you offer new and emerging writers wanting to enter this year’s contest?

I wholeheartedly encourage new and emerging writers to please share their work. Your stories matter. More than one wise soul has said that without stories, we have no identity, no historical record — we don’t exist.

Moreover, the practice of submitting to contests/publications is an important part of the writing life, and essential for the work ahead. I also believe there is immense room for a multitude of diverse, as of yet, unheard voices. Enter. Don’t be shy!

Nicole Breit is a poet, essayist and all around word nerd based in Vancouver. Check out her website.


Submit to the CNFC/carte blanche contest by November 30 at midnight EST.